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The Fifth Annual Conference on Global Higher Education at Lakeland University Japan

Presentation Summary

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Playing Politics: Using Detroit: Become Human to Teach Concepts in Government and Civic Engagement
1A   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Classroom: New Methods   •   Room: LUJ 2F
This presentation will discuss the utility and challenges of using a high-budget Playstation game as a core element of a course in a globalized classroom. I will detail my experience of using the PS4 game Detroit: Become Human as a vehicle for students to better understand the social movement strategies for change, civil rights, gender politics, and law enforcement in the United States.
Adam Tompkins
Lakeland University Japan

Contact information: tompkins@japan.lakeland.edu

Authentic Material Use in the EFL Classroom: Movies and TV Shows
1A   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Classroom: New Methods   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Assessing student attitudes, teacher practices and institutional policy as regards the use of movies and full TV episodes in class. Recommendations are provided.
Todd Leroux
Hakuoh University

Contact information: tleroux@fc.hakuoh.ac.jp

Globalizing the classroom through active learning
1A   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Classroom: New Methods   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Better teaching and servicing of our students in some ways means teaching less. Active learning is a modern and more efficient approach which utilizes the powers of the internet to relegate preparation to students before class, and instead re-engineers the classroom into a space for interaction and two-way communication. The presentation will introduce key components for successful deployment of an active learning system to create a lively, modern interactive learning space.
Steven Bohme
Keio University
Steven is a native of Canada and has been in Japan for over 30 years as a student, trainer and instructor. He is a former Apple employee and currently teaches at Keio University. His research focuses on student motivation.
Contact information: steven.bohme@keio.jp

Modeling motion within and between linguistic realms
1B   •   10:15-11:35   •   Introducing New Programs   •   Room: SGC 2A
This presentation discusses the underpinnings of a Global Model of English language use as a lingua franca and demonstrates a recent refinement allowing for a systematic organization of communicative circumstances into seven categories based upon the relative proficiency and flexibility of the interlocutors. This focuses teaching on strategies that mitigate asymmetries so that users can successfully interact despite differences in variety and proficiency level. Practical examples of pedagogy based on this modeling will be provided.
Christopher G. Haswell, Aaron Hahn
Christopher G. Haswell - Kyushu University; Aaron Hahn - Fukuoka University
Christopher G. Haswell is an Associate Professor in the Faculty of Languages and Cultures at Kyushu University in Fukuoka, Japan. His doctoral studies focused on the internationalization of universities in Asia, specifically the opinions of Asian students studying at university at various stages of internationalization in Japan, Korea, and China. He welcomes communication with other researchers in the field. (Aaron Hahn provided a biography in his individual presentation registration)
Contact information: haswellkyudai@gmail.com

Globalisation in Japanese education across the modern period
1B   •   10:15-11:35   •   Introducing New Programs   •   Room: SGC 2A
Although pedagogical imperatives emphasizing globalization through the acquisition of foreign language skills are frequently presented as innovative, twenty-first century phenomena, in reality, they have a long history in Japanese education. This paper takes Meiji-period educational shifts as a starting point to consider the current emphasis on global studies within the context of the long, complex relationship that Japan has had with the study of English and other foreign languages throughout the modern period.
Kelly Hansen
Kumamoto University
Kelly Hansen received her PhD in Japanese literature and linguistics from the University of Hawai’i. She currently teaches in the literature department at Kumamoto University. Her research focuses on women’s voices in modern literature, film, and electronic publications, and the use of digital humanities for both research and classroom activities.
Contact information: kellyjhansen@hotmail.com

Educating University Students about Global Citizenship
1B   •   10:15-11:35   •   Introducing New Programs   •   Room: SGC 2A
College educators of various disciplines can help students cultivate some of the competencies necessary for embracing global citizenship, including critical thinking, compassion, and conflict resolution. By embedding community building and relevant global knowledge into university courses, professors can assist learners to effectively traverse the positive and negative consequences of globalization by acknowledging the gains, addressing the challenges, and making decisions that benefit the global community.
Holly Woolbright
Lakeland University Japan



How to Promote Environmental Literacy Using Education for Sustainable Development: A Case Study
1C   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Global Classroom   •   Room: SGC 3A
Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) is still unfamiliar in Japanese universities but it is a powerful tool to increase student awareness of critical world issues, like climate change. The researcher will present a case study of ESD integration into a Content and Language Integrated (CLIL) course and exhibit the results with lessons learned. This presentation will be of interest to language teachers using the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) or environmental topics in their language classrooms.
Joshua John Jodoin
Kyoto University
Joshua Jodoin is currently a doctoral candidate at Kyoto University’s Graduate School of Global Environmental Studies (GSGES). He has previously worked at Kwansei Gakuin University, the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC), and Bilkent University in Ankara, Turkey. Joshua’s current interests revolve around Environmental Education (EE), Education for Sustainable Development (ESD), and English as a Foreign Language (EFL). His research is focused on ways the EFL world can create stronger ties to Environmental literacy.
Contact information: jodoin.john.65m@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp

Ecolinguistics: Ethical Directions in Higher Education
1C   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Global Classroom   •   Room: SGC 3A
This presentation seeks to promote the introduction of an Ecolinguistics course to higher-education curricula in the interest of preparing young learners for participation in our complex, global society. Ecolinguistics offers a deeper understanding of the issues contemporary society currently faces, a critical language ability to discuss those issues, and an extensive application of critical thinking to find solutions to those issues in the form of new world-views about the planet.
Mario Leto
Meiji University
Mario Leto is assistant professor at Meiji University and is working on his doctoral degree in Literary and Critical Studies at the University of Gloucestershire in the UK. His research concentration is in Ecolinguistics where he focuses on the critical analysis of language in online news media about veganism. His past research includes an examination of implicit nationalist rhetoric, representations of tourists, and attitudes toward multi-ethnic peoples.
Contact information: japanecolinguisticsassociation@gmail.com

Leadership Education to Foster Youth Development for Social Change
1C   •   10:15-11:35   •   The Global Classroom   •   Room: SGC 3A
Leadership education elements – critical thinking, emotional intelligence and moral imagination, generate intra and interpersonal development. By analyzing the process of leadership education from diverse perspectives, this study reveals a multi-dimensional understanding of how personal and community development happens through constant reflection and collective engagement. The results of this study shed light on the impact of leadership education on youth development and how it can be applied for effective social change.
Estela Shiratori

Brazilian with Japanese descendancy, Estela has studied in three different countries and graduated from the Faculty of International Liberal Arts at Soka University in Japan. Estela has acquired a deeper understanding of empathy despite cross-cultural differences as she has worked and studied in various cultures – doing an internship for the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, and volunteering in Kalikot, Nepal. Estela aims to expand and deepen her research on leadership education for youth development.


Global Competence from the Student Perspective
2A   •   11:45-1:05   •   Global Leadership and Comptetence   •   Room: LUJ 2F
This presentation will report on how two university students understood the term "global competence" based on their experiences and educational backgrounds. Two students, who studied abroad for one academic year, were given a questionnaire containing five items. The responses were analyzed using a global competence checklist developed by the presenter. Afterwards, the students were interviewed one-on-one to gain deeper insight into their responses and a sense of understanding for global competence.
Wayne Malcolm
Fukui University of Technology
Wayne Malcolm has been teaching English as a foreign language in Japan since September 2002, when he arrived in Japan. With doctorate of education in curriculum and instruction he currently focuses his research and teaching efforts on improving oral communicative ability. He also researches methods in advancing overall global competence, as well as the cross-section between policy initiative and curriculum development. Other commitments include volunteering for JALT, and of course spending time with his family.
Contact information: wamalcolm@gmail.com

An Explorative Analysis of UN SDG 4.7: What Can We Learn from University Faculty Members and Students Navigating Global Citizenship Education in Japan?
2A   •   11:45-1:05   •   Global Leadership and Comptetence   •   Room: LUJ 2F
This presentation is an analysis of the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) Target 4.7, specifically global citizenship education (GCE) in relation to university teaching and learning in Japan. The author explores the values, knowledge and behaviors of university teachers and students navigating the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO, 2015) framework for GCE in classroom settings.
Emiliano Bosio
Yokohama City University, University College London
Emiliano Bosio, full-time Lecturer at Yokohama City University, Japan and Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Curriculum, Pedagogy and Assessment (CPA) at University College London, UK. His work is centered on developing and integrating innovative approaches to Global Citizenship Education (GCE) into university curricula across Asia, Europe and the US. Mr. Bosio's research embraces education policies for global citizenship, Intercultural-Communication/Adaptation, Second-Language Acquisition, Value Creating Education and transformative education.
Contact information: ebosio@yokohama-cu.ac.jp

Leadership Education, Students, and a Global Context
2A   •   11:45-1:05   •   Global Leadership and Comptetence   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Leadership education supports student learners in becoming leaders in a global context through the lens of three elements: knowledge, praxis, and reflection. This exploratory case study focused on forty students from two university seminar classes, who collaborated in two, day-long leadership workshops. Findings demonstrate that leadership education is strengthened when the demographic complexity of participants is handled directly, with the intention of being inclusive of the diversity of both Japanese and international students.
Dr. Maria Guajardo, Dr. Robert Stroud
Dr. Maria Guajardo, Soka University; Dr. Robert Stroud, Hosei University
Maria Guajardo is Vice-President and Professor at Soka University, Tokyo. Her research is in the field of leadership development, with a focus on women, global leaders, and global citizenship education. A recent publication includes Humanism as the Foundation for Global Citizen Education. She served as the founding Dean for the Faculty of International Liberal Arts at Soka University. Maria received her A.B. from Harvard University, and her M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Denver.
Contact information: guajardo@soka.ac.jp, robertstroud@hosei.ac.jp

Introducing European and East-Asian Perspectives on Queer Theory in the classroom
2B   •   11:45-1:05   •   Curriculum Changes and Challenges   •   Room: SGC 2A
This talk discusses a project at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf that aims to bridge the criticisms of European-centrism and Queer Pedagogy through practices of teaching Queer Theory in the classroom. Organized at the Chair for Cultural Studies at the Department of Modern Japanese Studies, this course is one of the first at the university with an explicit focus on Queer Theory and the first to bring together transnational perspectives from Asia and Europe.
Jasmin Rückert
Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf
Jasmin Rückert is currently a PHD student at the Department of Modern Japanese Studies, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf. Her research focuses mainly on Japanese propaganda. Kawasaka Kazuyoshi is an assistant professor at the same program and specializes on Queer Theory.


Cultivating Holistic Competencies through Experiential Learning in Marketing Education
2B   •   11:45-1:05   •   Curriculum Changes and Challenges   •   Room: SGC 2A
Holistic competencies is an umbrella term inclusive of generic skills (communication, teamwork, critical thinking, problem-solving, creativity, and time management), positive values, and attitudes (consideration, respect, appreciation, and lifelong learning). However, should holistic competencies be obligatory in a formal curriculum? Based on the Kolb (1984)’s experiential learning cycle, this study examines how holistic competencies could be cultivated through a student-centred social media project in an undergraduate Marketing course in Hong Kong Baptist University.
Dr. Glos Ho

Dr. Glos Ho is Associate Head of the Department of Marketing at Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU). She received her BSocSci degree from the University of New South Wales, an MA degree from Macquarie University and a PhD from the University of Hong Kong. She is a Senior Teaching Fellow of the Higher Education Academy. In 2006, she was awarded the Postgraduate Research Grant from the International Olympic Committee. She received the HKBU President Award for Outstanding Performance in Teaching in 2016 and Outstanding Performance in Team Teaching in 2018.
Contact information: glosho@hkbu.edu.hk

Teaching English Communication…Communication?
2B   •   11:45-1:05   •   Curriculum Changes and Challenges   •   Room: SGC 2A
English courses have been taught at Japanese universities for years. With the introduction of various global initiatives (MEXT’s “Top Global Initiative,” “Global Splendor” Plans, etc.) in recent years, these classes have shifted their focus from simply English language ability toward English “Communication.” However, this shift is not always represented in the actual language classroom, and the students often still do not even have a grasp of what “communication” itself means. The goal of this presentation is to introduce participants to qualitative data collected concerning student interpretations of communication and discuss the potential implications of the data for future development of communication classes. Topics will include the methods for collecting data, presentation of some collected data, problems and limitations of this study, and a discussion of implications for development of future communication courses will be made based on the data.
Brett R. Walter
Hiroshima University
Dr. Brett R. Walter (Lecturer, Hiroshima University), Institute for the Promotion of Global Education, Hiroshima University, Japan


Toward a Mixed Qualitative Method for Japanese Higher Education Research
2C   •   11:45-1:05   •   EMI and CLIL   •   Room: SGC 3A
Ethnographies in Japanese HE are relatively limited—especially in English—, and still face many difficulties in regard to methodological approach and access. As research on EMI and undergraduate ETPs begin to see more published research (See research by Brown and Bradford), it will become even more important to look at how international students and international faculty navigate and function in these environments, what challenges they face, how they function, and what support might prove beneficial within the Japanese university system.
Brian Berry
University of Tokyo (PhD Student)



The historical development of English medium degree and non-degree programs in Japanese higher education, and future directions
2C   •   11:45-1:05   •   EMI and CLIL   •   Room: SGC 3A
This presentation reports on the historical development of English-medium instruction (EMI) and full-degree English-taught programs (ETPs) in Japanese higher education and provides a comparison of the literature on EMI/ETPs in Europe and Asia with Japan’s case. It then discusses the similarities and differences of EMI/ETPs practices in the literature and comments on the future of EMI/ETPs in Japanese higher education. 
Mahboubeh Rakhshandehroo
Osaka University, Kansai University
Mahboubeh Rakhshandehroo obtained her PhD in Human Sciences (Critical Studies in Transformative Education) from the Graduate School of Human Sciences, Osaka University in March 2019. Her research focuses on graduate international student English-Medium Instruction (EMI) support at Japanese universities. From April 2019, she is a part-time lecturer of Faculty Development (FD) Program at Kansai University.
Contact information: prakhshandehroo@gmail.com

Starting EMI in Japan: Keys for success in program planning
2C   •   11:45-1:05   •   EMI and CLIL   •   Room: SGC 3A
English-medium instruction (EMI) is increasingly popular at Japanese universities, especially programs targeting domestic students. Findings from a three-year case study of four newly-forming EMI programs show the importance of communication among stakeholders and university leaders, selection and support of faculty members, clear positioning in the university community, shared understanding of goals and aims, realistic understanding of students’ incoming language proficiency, and internal coherence and meaningful connections to mainstream programs.
Howard Brown
University of Niigata Prefecture

Contact information: brown@unii.ac.jp

Teachers' perceptions of first language (L1) use in the second language (L2) classroom
2D   •   11:45-1:05   •   The Classoom: Theory and Practice   •   Room: LUJ Library
I intend to present the findings of a recently published paper which examined the perspectives of a group of English language teachers working in two Japanese universities to the use of the first language in the second language classroom. This presentation will elucidate those findings.
Jagon Chichon
Asia University

Contact information: jagonchichon1978@gmail.com

A Simple Mantra
2D   •   11:45-1:05   •   The Classoom: Theory and Practice   •   Room: LUJ Library
Know your subject; love your subject. Know your students; love your students."" All you need to know to be a student-centred teacher! I'll develop each item by illustrating official, social and individual obstacles that prevent fulfilment, e.g.: .
• Native-speakers' ignorance of their own language
• Constraints to teaching one’s real expertise
• Lack of information about students’ background
• Conflicting students’ and teachers’ aims
I'll make proposals on how government should remedy the situation.
Paul Snowden
Professor, Kyorin University; Emeritus, Waseda University
University teacher, and now administrator in Japan since 1978, I feel like Forrest Gump, having been present through decades of significant upheavals and reforms in higher education.


Stereotyping and Post-Structural Analysis
2D   •   11:45-1:05   •   The Classoom: Theory and Practice   •   Room: LUJ Library
In analyzing a narrative about an old man and a young woman who ostensibly symbolize the binary of death and live respectively, Roland Barthes suggests several features (such as these characters’ appearing suddenly in each other’s space) that challenge this symbolic binary, exemplifying a post-structural analysis. After outlining the methodologies of Roland Barthes’ S/Z and of Jacques Derrida, suggestions will be made to tailor these methodologies—means of challenging stereotypes and binaries—to EFL activities.
Jeffrey McEntire

Jeffrey McEntire, M.A., Intercultural studies, ESL teacher for eleven years is from Dallas, TX, USA and teaches at Kanda Institute of Foreign Languages.
Contact information: mcentire-j@kifl.ac.jp

LearnerAttitudes toward Autonomy at a Vocational School in Japan
3A   •   2:20-3:40   •   Studying Abroad   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Are East Asian students culturally unsuited to autonomous learning methods? In a seminal paper, Littlewood (1999) argued, “no.” We administered the same 10-item questionnaire originally given by Littlewood to his students in Hong Kong to students at a vocational school in Kawasaki, wondering whether his results would be repeated. Responses largely supported Littlewood’s original claim that generalizations about East Asian learners, no matter how useful, must always be viewed with caution.
Dr. Jeremy Chambers, Sean Mitchell, Adam Littleton
Dr. Jeremy Chambers: Temple University and College of Business and Communication
Sean Mitchell: College of Business and Communication
Adam Littleton: College of Business and Communication
Dr. Jeremy Chambers has been in the English education field for over 10 year, working with a wide range of students and organizations. His studies have been focused on communication and pronunciation, as well as how to best adapt practices to meet the Japanese education environment. Sean Mitchell is an English Teacher at the College of Business and Communication in Kawasaki. He has almost 15 years of experience in the field. Adam Littleton has been teaching English in Japan for nearly a decade. He has previously published work on the emotion regulation strategies used by teachers in the classroom (Littleton (2018) Emotion regulation strategies of kindergarten ESL teachers in Japan: an interview-based survey, The Language Learning Journal, DOI: 10.1080/09571736.2018.1542020).


EAP and After: Student Success at University
3A   •   2:20-3:40   •   Studying Abroad   •   Room: LUJ 2F
This presentation describes qualitative research conducted at a Canadian university to gain insight into the experiences of 8 non-native English speaking students who completed an EAP program and then moved into their first term of university. I will discuss the aspects of the EAP program that prepared them for disciplinary courses and the challenges that they faced in a Canadian English-medium university. I will also make recommendations to help students overcome those challenges.
Karin Keefe
Temple University Japan

Contact information: karkeefe@gmail.com

Pluriliteracies, CLIL and global jinzai
3A   •   2:20-3:40   •   Studying Abroad   •   Room: LUJ 2F
I propose a speculative model to understand what pluriliteracies might mean vis-à-vis not only CLIL, but multiliteracies/semiotics. The question is on how to understand the increasingly complex nature and dynamic of Japanese tertiary education, that is, how home and foreign students (predominantly Chinese/Asian) desire to switch between multiple languages in the English-language classroom, to switch between English and Japanese at will (and indeed their native tongue). Pluriliteracies is one way to understand this new dynamic.
Joff P.N. Bradley
Teikyo University, Tokyo
Joff P.N. Bradley is an Associate Professor in the faculty of language studies at Teikyo University in Tokyo, Japan and Visiting Professor at Jamia Millia Islamia University, Delhi, India. He is the co-editor of Deleuze and Buddhism and co-writer of A Pedagogy of Cinema. He has recently co-edited Educational Philosophy and New French Thought and Principles of Transversality in Globalization and Education with David R Cole. He is a member of the New Tokyo Group in Japan, a committed group of language scholars working on critical pedagogy projects in the nation's capital and beyond.
Contact information: https://teikyo-u.academia.edu/JoffBradley; joff@main.teikyo-u.ac.jp

Immersing Students in English through Online Extensive Reading
3B   •   2:20-3:40   •   The Classroom: Reading and Vocab   •   Room: SGC 2A
The presenters will demonstrate how using an extensive reading website provides students with interesting and stimulating stories from a wide variety of topics, which enables them to learn not only English, but also big ideas and valuable lessons for life. The presenters will also explain how students and teachers can set reading goals, track progress and word counts, and how an extensive reading website can be used in the classroom for listening and speaking activities.
Dr. Douglas E. Forster & Dr. Joseph W. Poulshock
Dr. Douglas E. Forster, Japan Women's University Dr. Joseph W. Poulshock, Senshu University
Dr. Douglas Forster is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at Japan Women's University. Dr. Joseph W. Poulshock is a Professor in the School of Economics at Senshu University. Both are proponents of extensive reading and co-chairs for the JALT ER SIG.
Contact information: http://www.readoasis.com

Improving Academic Literacy
3B   •   2:20-3:40   •   The Classroom: Reading and Vocab   •   Room: SGC 2A
Increasing lexical knowledge is essential if students are to successfully improve their academic literacy. In this presentation, I will present an approach for learning new vocabulary that I have developed and successfully used in my classes. This is a carefully structured approach, which contextually presents new language, and enables students to quickly remember and be able to naturally use the new language to discuss both familiar and then more abstract, academic topics.
Mark Feeley
Lakeland University Japan
Mark Feeley is an EAP Instructor on the EAP program at Lakeland University Japan. A qualified English teacher, with over 20 years’ experience of materials development and teaching English in Japan, Mark has an MA in Human Geography, an MBA in International Human Resource Management, and an MA in Japanese Language and Society. Mark specialises in teaching academic research methods and improving students’ academic literacy.
Contact information: feeley@japan.lakeland.edu

Implementing Quizlet in a Japanese EFL University
3B   •   2:20-3:40   •   The Classroom: Reading and Vocab   •   Room: SGC 2A
This presentation will introduce the implementation of the online flashcard platform, Quizlet. First, the basic features and rationale for its implementation will be outlined. The presenter will detail how Quizlet was implemented into a fluency-focused curriculum with a particular focus on its application in the contexts of group, pair and individual activities including homework allocation and tracking. Finally, the presenter will discuss the limitations of Quizlet before showing results of students’ impressions of using Quizlet.
Christopher Tempest
Sojo University
Christopher Tempest graduated from Newcastle University (UK) with a combined-honours in Japanese and Information Systems before perusing an MA in TESOL from University College London. He has been an educator in Japan for almost 10 years and his research interests are in second language acquisition, computer aided language learning, and cross-linguistic influences. He is currently at Sojo University, Kumamoto, where he is implementing and assisting in the development of a speaking-fluency focused curriculum.
Contact information: ctempest@m.sojo-u.ac.jp

Accountability in Evaluation: how this aspect is crucial in evaluations and organizational levels
3C   •   2:20-3:40   •   Program Evaluation   •   Room: SGC 3A
This presentation focuses on how evaluation should pay attention to all organizational levels to be effective.
Francisco Naranjo Escobar
Lakeland University Japan
Bachelor of Honors in Linguistics Applied, Universidad de Santiago de Chile Master of Applied Linguistics, Melbourne University
Contact information: francisco.naranjo.escobar@gmail.com

Creating a Better Learning Experience through Program Evaluation
3C   •   2:20-3:40   •   Program Evaluation   •   Room: SGC 3A
Recent research into teaching and learning allows deep insight into the best practices for developing a good learning experience. Likewise, many universities have increased the amount of available data concerning student learning outcomes. Can this information be productively utilized? This presentation stresses the importance of evidence-based, collaborative program evaluation conducted by the actual classroom teachers, fostering a better learning experience for students through teacher-centered virtuous-circle practices.
John Nevara
Kagoshima University



Meeting the Needs of Diverse Students
3D   •   2:20-3:40   •   Meeting Specific Student Needs   •   Room: LUJ Library
This presentation mainly constitutes of the reflection of the presenter’s experience that will also include the following: insights into the institutional support from both the students and the teacher’s perspective, the presenter’s classroom practices especially on the attempts and the outcome of creating a learning environment to meet the diverse needs of the students. The presenter will also introduce the voice of the particular student provided through his reflection.
Mizuka Tsukamoto




Students Helping Students: An Introduction to the TIU Peer Writing Center, PAW
3D   •   2:20-3:40   •   Meeting Specific Student Needs   •   Room: LUJ Library
The Tokyo International University (TIU) peer writing center, PAW, provides a useful model for the application of writing centers in university EMI programs in Japan and around the world.
Alexandra Pellillo & Daniel Scharf
Global Teaching Institute at Tokyo International University
Daniel and Alexandra are Global Teaching Fellows and writing center coordinators, for the Peer Advisers for Writing (PAW) at TIU. Daniel and Alexandra teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL) and academic literacy courses to Japanese and international students.
Contact information: tiuwriting@gmail.com; https://tiugtipaw.wordpress.com/

Rethinking global competency attitudes, knowledge and skills in the quest for globally competent human resources in Japan
4A   •   4:30-5:50   •   Attitudes about Globalization   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Through a variety of government-funded initiatives, the concept of global jinzai has become ubiquitous in Japanese higher education rhetoric. Yet, it remains vague and disconnected from both models of intercultural competence and institutional implementation strategies. The researcher will discuss findings from documents published by the government and Top Global universities, challenging stakeholders to rethink how attitudes, knowledge and skills emphasised can be more successfully translated into practical initiatives so as to develop globally competent graduates.
Ana Sofia Hofmeyr
Osaka University, Kansai University
Ana Sofia Hofmeyr is a Lecturer at the Faculty of Foreign Language Studies of Kansai University and a PhD student at the Graduate School of Human Sciences of Osaka University. She has a BA in Modern Languages and a Masters in Culture and Identity Studies. Her current research concerns internationalisation strategies at the higher education level with a specific focus on the development of intercultural competence in domestic students through internationalisation-at-home initiatives.
Contact information: hofmeyr.asofia@gmail.com

Global Competence through Personalization and Comparative Reflections
4A   •   4:30-5:50   •   Attitudes about Globalization   •   Room: LUJ 2F
The challenge we face is to engage students in meaningful ways. In my global course I use personalization and comparative reflections to do this. Personalized assignments leverage individual interests and insights through targeted travel reflections and sharing/comparing. Underpinning the exercises is theory on the “tourist” gaze that influences social constructions of culture and mobility. Students individually and co-react towards travel, study abroad, or relocation destinations in directed activities.
Dr. Bonnie Canziani
University of North Carolina Greensboro
Dr. Canziani has taught global and diversity-focused courses at UNC Greensboro (UNCG) and beyond. She spent five years developing Cornell-affiliated hospitality degree programs in Latin America. Dr. Canziani has consulted in Taiwan and was also part of a UNCG delegation invited to China. She has a strong interest in assessing cultural competency, has served as assessment consultant to regional accreditation efforts and is a certified Intercultural Deployment Inventory (IDI) administrator.
Contact information: bmcanzia@uncg.edu

Internationalizing or happily “performing” internationalization? A critical exploration of internationalization narratives in Japanese universities, with particular attention to international students’ voices
4A   •   4:30-5:50   •   Attitudes about Globalization   •   Room: LUJ 2F
Although Japanese universities have been endorsing internationalization in their public statements, a gap exists between official rhetoric and the reality on the ground. In fact, many criticize Japanese universities’ approach to internationalization for being overly concerned with numerical “input-output” indicators at the expense of genuine educational and institutional reform (Watanabe, Sato & Murasawa, 2018). Furthermore, in many non-elite, second-tier institutions in particular, internationalization is often “performed” mainly for marketing purposes (Ball, 2000), thus hardly going beyond the tatemae or lip-service level (Chapple, 2014). This research combines a multiple case study approach with a social constructivist perspective in order to dig deeper into the above issues by exploring the different stakeholders’ interpretations of the meaning, purpose and challenges facing internationalization within their own institutions. Against this backdrop, I also investigate the experiences of international students in order to give voice to those who should be center stage in internationalization, but often appear to be ignored or conveniently forgotten.
Theo Slogar
Ryukoku University, Graduate School of Intercultural Communication

Contact information: theo.slogar@gmail.com

How Global Factors Affect the Development of Teaching Skills for New Academics in One University in Hong Kong
4B   •   4:30-5:50   •   Teaching and Planning   •   Room: SGC 2A
This presentation will discuss the emerging trends in the development of teaching skills for new academics in higher education in Hong Kong; how the case study university responses to the call for effective teaching in higher education under the powerful global forces, including the changing nature of its educational development unit, the emergence of policy advocating the provision of programmes to support the development of teaching skills for new academics, as well as new academics’ preference for development.
Dr Barbara Tam

Barbara is an Educational Developer at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Before joining the university, she had been working at various levels of education. She now plays a key role in the university’s offering of teaching development programmes to meet the needs of teaching staff at different ranks and career stages.
Contact information: etbtam@polyu.edu.hk

Power, autonomy, and student-centered learning: Investigations from a corpus of published lesson plans
4B   •   4:30-5:50   •   Teaching and Planning   •   Room: SGC 2A
The reported study examined a corpus of published English language lessons plans. The research, which utilizes a critical discourse analysis framework, found that the genre perpetuates a large power differential between students and teachers. While active learning is supported, student autonomy is not. Furthermore, the corpus is student-focused but not student-centered. The discourse constructs and promotes the belief that students are the objects of teachers’ actions, rather than the subjects of their own learning.
Aaron Hahn
Fukuoka University
Aaron Hahn is a Lecturer at Fukuoka University. He holds a Doctorate of Literature in English Language Teaching from Kumamoto University. He researches how new pedagogical practices and sociolinguistic modeling can help shift English language instruction from native-speaker focused models towards internationally and transculturally focused English. Additionally, he researches professional TESOL discourse using critical discourse analysis to understand the links between teacher discourse, students and teacher identities and beliefs, power, and ideology.
Contact information: aaronhahn@hotmail.com

Student-oriented Curriculum Design: Practical Goals in EFL
4B   •   4:30-5:50   •   Teaching and Planning   •   Room: SGC 2A
Forgoing preexisting textbooks to create original material allows it to be tailored to specific student needs in terms of academic specializations, career paths, and life-long benefits. However, this requires much greater time and effort and it is vital to carefully assess the practical returns offered. This presentation examines how a process of lateral, analytical and critical thinking can be used to develop and refine subject material for students engaged in specialized fields of study.
Gavan Patrick Gray
Tsuda University

Contact information: gray@tsuda.ac.jp

Reevaluating How We Teach Notetaking
4C   •   4:30-5:50   •   The Classroom: Listening and Speaking   •   Room: SGC 3A
Participants in this workshop will be invited to consider and articulate their current teaching practices in relation to notetaking. There will be discussion of the challenges and issues related to notetaking in ELT, and some analysis of popular notetaking textbooks. A four-step approach to teaching notetaking with authentic materials will also be introduced, with presenters sharing their experiences in using this scaffolded approach, and participants encouraged to join this effort to improve teaching of notetaking.
Michael Crawford, Jack Hayford, Andy Lawson
Dokkyo University, NIC International College in Japan, NIC International College in Japan
The three presenters are part of a growing band of brothers and sisters who are hell-bent on finding better ways to 'teach notetaking'. Join us!
Contact information: naritalawson@gmail.com

Coming Out of Their Shells: Effective Techniques for Promoting Oral Participation in Japanese EFL Classes
4C   •   4:30-5:50   •   The Classroom: Listening and Speaking   •   Room: SGC 3A
As the field of TEFL moves increasingly towards communicative, interaction based pedagogy, and as more locally, the Japanese Ministry of Education continues to stress the importance of improving oral production, the need to get students speaking English in class has become crucial. However, as any TEFL instructor ever faced with a class full of silent, unresponsive Japanese learners can attest, this is a task far easier said than done. With this difficult yet vital dilemma in mind, this presentation will explain five techniques that can be employed to transform a reticent, uncommunicative class into a more vocally active, dynamic group. I will take an overview of some of the most pertinent research and theories underpinning these techniques, as well as look at some practical methods to apply them in class. I will also briefly examine the issue of the silent Japanese EFL classroom and its sources.
Brendan Garland
Asia University

Contact information: bgarland@asia-u.ac.jp

Poster Session: Authentic Competency-based and Task-based Teaching and Assessment in Tertiary EFL in Japan
POSTER   •   3:45-4:25   •   Poster Session   •   Room: TBA
This study examines the relationships between perceptions of competency-based (CBLT) and task-based language teaching (TBLT) by Japanese university foreign language professors and their implementation of localized approaches. Results provide an intuitive description of CBLT and TBLT as well as useful reflection on types of user-friendly materials for tertiary language educators.
Kinsella Valies
Prefectural University of Shizuoka

Contact information: MAILURL

Poster Session: Global Higher Education and the Emergence of Leadership in University Students
POSTER   •   3:45-4:25   •   Poster Session   •   Room: TBA
This study examined the emergence of leadership competencies in university students. Through an exploratory qualitative case study, it analyzed how the university contributes to self-identity development as a leader; and if students aim to become global leaders. Findings addressed changes in the environment and exposure to different cultures that influence students’ perceptions towards themselves and the world, which potentially impacts their development as leaders. Global Higher Education triggers the potential of future leaders
Cintia Kiyomi Shiratori, Hanami Ishihara, Luiza Harumi Ishizaki, Mirai Kudo
Soka University

Contact information: Cintia Kiyomi Shiratori (e1635119@soka-u.jp), Hanami Ishihara(e1635213@soka-u.jp), Luiza Harumi Ishizaki (e1635112@soka-u.jp), Mirai Kudo (e1635111@soka-u.jp).

Poster Session: The internationalized university classroom: student diversity, well-being and global citizenship
POSTER   •   3:45-4:25   •   Poster Session   •   Room: TBA
This poster presents the experiences of both international and domestic students in Japan as they navigate new contexts and cultures and learn to feel a sense of belonging in classrooms that are internationalizing in different ways. Survey and in-depth interviews inform the study. Students elaborate on their feelings towards increased classroom diversity and their understandings of global citizenship.
Dr. Annette Bradford
Meiji University

Contact information: https://annettebradford.net

Poster Session: Using MOOCs in class to meet students' needs and motivations
POSTER   •   3:45-4:25   •   Poster Session   •   Room: TBA
Graduates require autonomous learning skills and communication experience to navigate today’s changing landscape. Additionally, students desire content that is personally relevant to their interests and futures. In English elective courses facilitated by the presenters, students study independently on massive open online courses (MOOCs) and keep a journal focused on their learning development and strategy use. The presenters argue that embedding MOOC study in the curriculum makes university classes more relevant to students’ needs and motivations.
Huw Davies, Rob Stevenson
Kanda University of International Studies

Contact information: davies-h@kanda.kuis.ac.jp

Poster Session: The Impact of Dialogical Cosmopolitanism in the SDGs Era, A Case Study of Global Citizenship Program, SUJ
POSTER   •   3:45-4:25   •   Poster Session   •   Room: TBA
My poster focuses on what I denominate multidimensional cosmopolitan dialogue (MCD) as an intersection of dialogical lifelong learning and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). I research the Global Citizenship Program from Soka University as a place in which the MCD praxis is present.
Alesse Nunes
Soka University

Contact information: alesse@gmail.com